Massive Hurricane Florence to Slam the Carolinas

Hurricane Florence, now a major category 3 hurricane with winds in excess of 115 mph, is expected to restrengthen as it makes its way towards the coast. Storm Surge and Hurricane Warnings are in effect from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, to the northern Outer Banks in North Carolina, with Hurricane Watches extending as far south as Charleston.

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Official NHC track and wind field assessment as of 8:00 PM ET on September 12, 2018.

Although the effects of Hurricane Florence will begin to impact the Carolinas starting tomorrow afternoon, strong winds and heavy rain will continue to lash the region until the end of the weekend due to the storm’s unusual path.

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This is theĀ  18z 9/12/18 run of the NAM 3km computer model depicting an extremely intense Hurricane Florence approaching the Wilmington, NC area.

For the past several days, computer model guidance has shifted to suggesting that Hurricane Florence will begin to slow down and proceed to parallel the coastline come Friday evening. The storm’s unusual path will force extremely dangerous winds and storm surge across a swath of land extending from the Outer Banks to South Carolina, placing millions under the threat of life-threatening conditions. Unfortunately, these conditions will only be compounded and exacerbated by the upwards of 3 feet of rain forecasted to fall in some areas.

The National Hurricane Center is forecasting winds to exceed 120 mph upon Hurricane Florence’s arrival near the coastline, with a storm surge exceeding 9-13 feet in some locations, making this storm extremely dangerous for those in its path.

If you have been ordered or asked to evacuate, please heed these orders immediately before it becomes too late to do so. All preparations for this storm should be completed immediately.

For more information, please consult the National Hurricane Center at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov or your local emergency management office.

Harvey to Make Landfall in Texas as Major Hurricane

Tropical Storm Harvey is now expected to be the first major hurricane to make landfall in The United States in over 12 years. Up to 24+ inches of rain is possible across the Texas Gulf Coast due to the slow-moving nature of the storm. Sustained winds of 115 mph with gusts potentially approaching 140 mph are now expected across wide swaths of the Texas Gulf Coast.

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The NHC 10 am CDT update depicting the potential path and intensity of Harvey over the next several days.

 

The 12 UTC NAM 3km computer model currently depicts a massive, dangerous storm making landfall in Texas tomorrow afternoon.

For more information, consult The National Hurricane Center at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov as well as The National Weather Service at http://www.weather.gov.